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Our visions of a sustainable food future

#1 Making climate-smart agriculture the norm, by Ana María Loboguerrero, Latin America Regional Program leader, CCAFS

#2 Restoring land and livelihoods: a call for public and private sectors, by Louis Verchot, Director, Soils and Landscapes for Sustainability (SoiLS) Research Area

#3 The changing face of agri-entrepreneurs in Asia, by Dindo Campilan, Regional Director, Asia

#4 Why healthy cities depend on vibrant countrysides, Stefan de Haan, Regional Program Management Officer (Vietnam)

#5 African agriculture: paving the way to prosperity, by Debisi Araba, Regional Director, Africa

#6 Nutrition in Africa: time for “unusual business”, by Mercy Lung’aho

#7 Beans without borders, by Clare Mukankusi

News

Nitrogen-efficient crops on the horizon:...

Science now offers an option to boost crop productivity and dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to the authors of a report that will appear this week in the journal Plant Science ...

The Latest

What is the place of ‘resilience’ in the New Urban Agenda?

The New Urban Agenda adopted by the UN General Assembly on 23 December 2016 is centered on sustainability and equity. The vision of the declaration is one of ‘cities for all, referring to the equal use and enjoyment of cities and human settlements, seeking to promote inclusivity (…) [and] where ...

Arturo Franco, the data “Magio”

El Rolo, as he is affectionately known by his co-workers, is saying goodbye to CIAT today, after 37 years of work ...

How diverse is the global diet?

When we published about the increasing homogeneity in global food supplies, we hadn’t yet found a good way to make the underlying national level data readily visible to interested readers. This is why the publication of our new Changing Global Diet website is exciting. It provides interactive visuals for 152 ...

Kenya’s drought masks a deeper problem with livestock feed

This opinion piece first appeared in Kenya's Business Daily Newspaper on May 1st. As this week’s Nairobi Burger Festival draws to a close, we revisit the underlying cause of a spike in milk prices and draw attention to an issue which could bring us fewer burgers to bite into in ...

Agro-climatic forecasts to the rescue…

In 2016, researchers at CIAT began working on the Climate Services for Resilient Development- Colombia project, funded by USAID, under its Climate Services for Resilient Development (CS4RD) program, and again with CCAFS’ support ...

Gender Connections: A role for communications, knowledge sharing, and data and information management, a brief

By: Simone Staiger Rivas For two years, CIAT supported the CGIAR Gender and Agriculture Research Network with communications, knowledge sharing and information management. The CGIAR Gender and Agriculture Research Network was created in 2012 to ensure that the system´s research programs are gender responsive. Since then, the Network has worked ...

Student perspectives from the field: Talking about the weather in Chiapas, Mexico

I met Lucy through Mari, an organizer of Mujeres y Maíz Criollo. Lucy lives in Amatenango, a community of Tseltal farmers outside of San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico ...

What we don’t know about John Miles

This article is about John Miles, a brilliant scientist, who is retiring from CIAT after working as a plant breeder in the tropical forages program for 37 years ...

Five surprising ways people’s diets have changed over the past 50 years

Newly released interactive infographics show how the so-called “globalized diet” has emerged. They unearth a number of surprises about the foods we eat across the world. Who’d have thought that Cameroonians officially consume the greatest variety of food crops, or that the global average diet looks a lot like what ...

The Quesungual Agroforestry System Takes Root in Nicaragua

Farmers in the Dry Corridor of Central America are using the Quesungual agroforestry system to maintain or increase their maize and bean yields, while improving ecosystem services and resilience ...

Sustainable Amazonian Landscapes – A project that advances leaving a sustainable footprint

The Sustainable Amazonian Landscapes Project (SAL), from the Decision and Policy Analysis (DAPA) Research Area (DAPA) at CIAT, which brings together scientists from other research areas such as Soil Health and the Forages research team, started the new year with its third annual meeting to follow up on activities carried ...

CIAT-Cirad-Embrapa rice researchers meet in Goiania to strengthen collaboration

On March 20th to 22nd, a meeting was held at Embrapa Rice and Beans Research Center (CNPAF) in Goiania, Brazil, to strengthen the rice breeding alliance among CIAT, Cirad and Embrapa ...
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Interactive Stories

Newly released interactive infographics show how the so-called “globalized diet” has emerged. They unearth a number of surprises about the foods we eat across the world. Who’d have thought ...
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Five surprising ways people’s diets have changed over the past 50 years

When many people hear the word cassava, they immediately think of a subsistence crop. Is this really the case? It depends on who you ask ...
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Cassava: Subsistence Crop or Trendy Commodity?

In Honduras, members of the Asociación de Familias Agropecuarias Artesanales Intibucanas Lencas, ASOFAIL, strive to become the main characters in their own development. With the support of VECO MA ...
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A commitment to inclusion in Honduras

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The International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) develops technologies, methods, and knowledge that better enable farmers, mainly smallholders, to enhance eco-efficiency in agriculture. This means we make production more competitive and profitable as well as sustainable and resilient through economically and ecologically sound use of natural resources and purchased inputs.

CIAT is a CGIAR Research Center.

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