Latin America and the Caribbean

What role can cacao for peace play in Colombia?

Purdue University and CIAT developed, over the course of a year or so, an analysis of the cacao production chain in Colombia, commissioned by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), in the context of the Cacao for Peace, financed by USAID.

How diverse is the global diet?

When we published about the increasing homogeneity in global food supplies, we hadn’t yet found a good way to make the underlying national level data readily visible to interested readers. This is why the publication of our new Changing Global Diet website is exciting. It provides interactive visuals for 152 countries over the past 50 years. We that hope you enjoy your investigations through time. Perhaps you can tell us where you think the changing global diet is headed.

Five surprising ways people’s diets have changed over the past 50 years

Newly released interactive infographics show how the so-called “globalized diet” has emerged. They unearth a number of surprises about the foods we eat across the world. Who’d have thought that Cameroonians officially consume the greatest variety of food crops, or that the global average diet looks a lot like what Cape Verdeans eat every day? These are just some of the nuggets you can explore in a new interactive website on the status and trends of the global diet.

Fair Trade Coffee’s Aftertaste

The International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) conducted the research project “Measuring and assessing impacts of Fair Trade for All on farmers, farmworkers, and the overall Fair Trade market system.” After the third year of the project, we analyzed the data collected to assess the impact of certification on farmworkers’ welfare and empowerment in Brazil and Nicaragua. We created two multi-dimensional indexes in order to evaluate the influence that certification has on several aspects of workers’ life.

Tropical grasses: feed and plumber

The pastures that cattle graze also act as their “toilets”. This is because, as cattle eat grass, they periodically urinate and, therefore, randomly deposit urine on the soil surface. Once in the soil, the deposited urine results in the creation of patches that are generally characterized by high concentrations of nitrogen.

CIAT in Latin America

Through our work in one of the most ecologically and agriculturally diverse regions on the planet, we aim to ensure that the whole world benefits from agricultural innovations developed in Latin America and the Caribbean.

With its wealth of natural resources, wide pool of human talent, and strong record of technological innovation, the region has great potential for achieving sustainable agricultural development as well as for strengthening global food security.

Contact

Carolina Navarrete

Regional Coordinator

c.navarrete@cgiar.org

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