Asia

How diverse is the global diet?

When we published about the increasing homogeneity in global food supplies, we hadn’t yet found a good way to make the underlying national level data readily visible to interested readers. This is why the publication of our new Changing Global Diet website is exciting. It provides interactive visuals for 152 countries over the past 50 years. We that hope you enjoy your investigations through time. Perhaps you can tell us where you think the changing global diet is headed.

Five surprising ways people’s diets have changed over the past 50 years

Newly released interactive infographics show how the so-called “globalized diet” has emerged. They unearth a number of surprises about the foods we eat across the world. Who’d have thought that Cameroonians officially consume the greatest variety of food crops, or that the global average diet looks a lot like what Cape Verdeans eat every day? These are just some of the nuggets you can explore in a new interactive website on the status and trends of the global diet.

Anchoring LINK in Asia

A backstopping workshop was organized early December 2016 in Nepal to review and adjust the first results from Heifer, as well as to provide recommendations and guidelines for further steps. The workshop was the opportunity to dive into the cases and provided space for peer reviews between Heifer countries.

Brewing a cassava crop model

CIAT and partner research centers from Vietnam work jointly in a project to develop and test a new simulation model for cassava. The model will facilitate farm-scale decision-making for improved agronomy in South-East Asia and the world.

About CIAT in Asia

Despite the economic miracle that Southeast and East Asia has experienced over the last four decades, a significant proportion of the population living in rural areas and relying on agriculture remain poor. The economic crisis that hit Southeast Asia in the mid-1990s demonstrated the importance of a rural base for much of the population and prompted a much-needed renewal of commitment to improve the conditions of smallholder farmers.

 

Contact

Dindo Campilan

Dindo Campilan

Regional Director

d.campilan@cgiar.org

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This