Agroecosystems and Sustainable Landscapes

Could these crops save Peruvian forests?

As noted in a previous blog, a study conducted by CIAT confirms that cacao production is not a main cause of forest loss in Colombia, unlike in several countries in Africa and Asia. Instead, cacao cultivation forms part of strategies to reduce conflict and save forests in the Latin American country.

CIAT leads project to reduce deforestation in the Peruvian Amazon

The initiative, jointly coordinated with the Peruvian Ministry of Environment (MINAM) and Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation (MINAGRI), the subnational government of Ucayali, and in partnership with international consultants Climate Focus (CF), aims to facilitate adoption of sustainable production practices for oil palm and cacao, and deliver on commitments to zero deforestation.

Scaling out sustainable livestock production alternatives: financing schemes in the Colombian Amazon

Peru and Colombia, countries harboring 23 per cent of the Amazon rainforest, are aware of the importance of this region as a provider of ecosystem services at the local, national, and global level. Conserving and sustainably harnessing the benefits that the Amazon ecosystem provides requires the design of sustainable alternatives for land use and management, to reduce pressure on forests and serve as a strategy for climate change mitigation and adaptation.

Conservation agriculture meets relay cropping

In 2003, the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) designed a set of long-term trials in Kenya to assess sustainability and productivity effects of a set of management practices. These practices included conservation agriculture (CA), a combination of mulching, reduced tillage, and crop rotation, which has since grown to be widely promoted across Eastern and Southern Africa (ESA) with good results.

SERVIR experts on ecosystem management and land-use change attend 2019 GFW Summit

The 2019 Global Forest Watch (GFW) Summit, held in Washington DC this week, opened with a retrospective on how deforestation monitoring systems have matured since their broad development in the early 2010s. Several Latin America countries have their own dedicated system. While many African and Asian countries have not yet created dedicated systems, they have come a long way in deforestation monitoring. Efforts such as Global Forest Watch, CIAT’s Terra-i system, and others are mature, providing near real-time data that can help governments, NGOs, the private sector, and others monitor and track deforestation across the world.

Where do we see our world in 2050?

What will food systems, agriculture and the environment look like in 2050? Given current trends, there is a range of highly contrasting outcomes
In one scenario, these bedrocks of society will have continued down their current path and faced significantly greater challenges than they do today.

Marcela Quintero

Marcela Quintero

Director, Agroecosystems and Sustainable Landscapes (ASL) Research Area

M.quintero@cgiar.org
This CIAT Blog was launched in January 2016. For articles related to soils prior to this date, visit our former blog.
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