Agrobiodiversity

How diverse is the global diet?

When we published about the increasing homogeneity in global food supplies, we hadn’t yet found a good way to make the underlying national level data readily visible to interested readers. This is why the publication of our new Changing Global Diet website is exciting. It provides interactive visuals for 152 countries over the past 50 years. We that hope you enjoy your investigations through time. Perhaps you can tell us where you think the changing global diet is headed.

Agro-climatic forecasts to the rescue…

In 2016, researchers at CIAT began working on the Climate Services for Resilient Development- Colombia project, funded by USAID, under its Climate Services for Resilient Development (CS4RD) program, and again with CCAFS’ support.

Carlos Jara, a Chilean with a CIAT passport and nationality

Now, Jarita, as he is known by his friends and colleagues, is retiring from the Center after working in the Bean Program and specifically in the Pathology Laboratory, where one of his greatest achievements was defining the differential kinds of angular leaf spot disease, which served to identify resistance genes for the creation of improved bean varieties.

Hans Rosling, an intellectual beacon who also illuminated CIAT

The spotlight of fame shone on Dr. Rosling in 2006, when he presented his first, and legendary TED Talk titled, “The best stats you’ve ever seen,” where, through analytical data, he questions the myths around developing countries. But Rosling was already recognized in the scientific world much earlier for his studies of cassava toxicity and food security in Africa. This brought him to CIAT in the early 1990s.

Tropical grasses: feed and plumber

The pastures that cattle graze also act as their “toilets”. This is because, as cattle eat grass, they periodically urinate and, therefore, randomly deposit urine on the soil surface. Once in the soil, the deposited urine results in the creation of patches that are generally characterized by high concentrations of nitrogen.

About agrobiodiversity research at CIAT

CIAT develops more resilient and productive varieties of cassava and common bean, together with tropical forages for livestock. We also help improve rice production in Latin America and the Caribbean.

The superior crop varieties that result from our collaborative work offer many valuable traits, such as high yield and stress tolerance, which are vital for guaranteeing global food supplies in the face of rapidly rising demand, shifting disease and insect pressures, rampant environmental degradation, and the looming threat of climate change.

 

Contact

Joe Tohme

Joe Tohme

Director, Agrobiodiversity Research Area

j.tohme@cgiar.org

This CIAT Blog was launched in January 2016. For articles related to agrobiodiversity prior to this date, visit our former blog. Please note the AgBio blog is not updated anymore.

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