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Solving hunger and malnutrition in Africa requires business, governments, social justice

The battle against hunger and malnutrition in Africa is heading in a positive direction, with impressive gains made across the continent in recent decades. But governments and the private sector still have many obstacles and opportunities to definitively bring an end to these issues that affect many millions of people. Ahead of World Food Day, which this year is promoting the goal of #ZeroHunger by 2030, experts from CIAT discussed some of the urgent actions needed to help attain this goal.

New partnership for a more sustainable forage production

CIAT and the Papalotla Group signed the agreement “Sustainable intensification for environmental benefits”. This agreement follows a long-term collaboration between both organizations, achieving a wide dissemination of hybrid pastures developed by CIAT and distributed by Papalotla, such as Cobra, Cayman, Camello, Mulato, and Mulato II.

CIAT “roots” in El Salvador

CIAT, acting through its Agroecosystems and Sustainable Landscapes research area, joins Catholic Relief Services (CRS), Caritas Santa Ana, and PRISMA, in a landscape restoration project titled “RAÍCES” (Roots), with the aim of building awareness among farmers about the importance of looking after soils as a NON-renewable resource against advanced degradation processes, by helping them to better understand soil processes and dynamics.

Partial food systems baseline assessment at the Vietnam benchmark sites

CIAT and the National Institute of Nutrition of Vietnam (NIN) launched a collaborative Partial Food Systems Baseline Assessment at different sites in the country. The aim of the study is to elucidate specific components of local Vietnamese food systems along a rural to urban gradient, with a specific focus on (i) diets and nutrition, (ii) nutrition status (anthropometry), (iii) consumer behavior and (iv) food flows.

Can we actually measure resilience?

Resilience is a concept that is being applied to many different domains, from infrastructure’s response to extreme events to a child facing domestic violence. “Is there a common unit of resilience, relevant to all those different cases?” was the question behind a study recently published in the journal Earth’s Future.

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